15 Best George Clooney Movies That Made Him The Megastar He Is Today

Although George Clooney is one of the most endearing actors in the world, his talent as an actor shouldn’t be overshadowed by his natural charm. Despite having a traditional “movie star” mentality akin to Old Hollywood icons like Cary Grant, Clooney has proven that he is incredibly versatile and capable of delivering in a variety of projects. Clooney devotes the same amount of dedication to every project, whether it’s science fiction, biopics, comedies, thrillers, tragedies, or even family movies.

He frequently plays with his persona, and he isn’t afraid to do important supporting roles in addition to his well-known leading ones. Clooney is one of the few television stars of the era to successfully segue into a film career. He originally gained notoriety on television with a critically lauded part on “ER.” Clooney has repeatedly apologised for his performance as Bruce Wayne in “Batman & Robin,” but he overcame the humiliation and went on to work on other films that are up for awards.

Clooney has collaborated with several of the top filmmakers now at work and routinely courted the Coen Brothers and Steven Soderbergh. Clooney has, nevertheless, also excelled as a great filmmaker in his own right.

The top 15 George Clooney films of all time are listed below.

Burn After Reading

The first, mediocre reviews for “Burn After Reading,” a Coen Brothers film from 2008, were incorrect, despite the movie not always being considered one of their greatest. The irreverent comedy, which responds to the constantly linked world of the 21st Century through oddball flawed characters who are caught up in an absurd plot, has withstood the test of time well. In a world that seems to be more clever and informed than ever, the realm of espionage and crime seems quite futile. The movie muses on the futility of attempting to make sense of things.

Clooney plays neurotic U.S. Marshal Harry Pfarrer, who covertly has an affair with Katie Cox, the wife of eccentric secret agent Osbourne (Tilda Swinton) (John Malkovich). Osbourne is about to retire and records information about his career on an audio cassette that he plans to use as the foundation for his autobiography, but the sensitive data is lost.

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, Clooney’s directorial debut from 2002, was an instant hit for uniqueness because to its quirky tone and blend of comedy, crime, and nonlinear storytelling. It’s challenging for a debut director to create such an impact, but Clooney had gained experience working with excellent directors and had shown he had his own distinct style in front of the camera. Sam Rockwell has one of his best performances in the part of Clooney, who also has a major role in the plot.

Chuck Barris (Rockwell), an aspiring television writer, moves to Manhattan following a breakup and finds employment as a page at NBC. Barris is hired by CIA handler Jim Byrd (Clooney) as he progresses in the television industry after he witnesses him fighting in a bar. Barris is hired by Byrd to kill people, but he doesn’t give up on his desire to be in television.

 

Fantastic Mr. Fox

It’s a common marketing trick to have a well-known actor do the voice of an animated character in a kid’s movie, and Clooney would seem to have little trouble doing so given his naturally calming voice. But in Wes Anderson’s 2009 version of the Rohl Dahl classic “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” he demonstrates true talent. Clooney is ideal as a classy robbery mastermind comparable to Danny Ocean in this entertaining adventure movie, which is among Anderon’s best works.

In order to fulfil his vow to his wife, Felicity, Mr. Fox gives up his life of crime (Meryl Streep). But Mr. Fox can never pass up a good opportunity for a robbery, so with the assistance of his best pal Clive Badger, he decides to rob three nasty farmers (Bill Murray). His son Ash is envious after he recruits his nephew Kristofferson Silverfox (Eric Anderson) (Jason Schwartzman). For a family audience, Anderson doesn’t alter his style in any way, and it’s funny how the characters use the word “curse” rather than actual swear words.

From Dusk Till Dawn

Clooney’s career began with “From Dusk Till Dawn,” which came shortly after his triumph on television with “ER,” and he quickly established his star status with a difficult performance. Dark comedy, thrillers, horror, and satire are all present in “From Dusk Till Dawn,” and it needs a skilled performer to navigate the abrupt mood adjustments. With a magnetic performance that respects the grim aspect of the subject, Clooney rose to the occasion.

Seth and Richie Gecko, two bank robbers, loot a number of banks around Texas before attempting to flee law enforcement at the border with Mexico (Clooney, Quentin Tarantino). Preacher Jacob Fuller (Harvey Keitel) and his daughter Katherine are abducted (Juliette Lewis). They set up camp at a loud border cantina in an attempt to remain undetected, but the revelation that the patrons there are vampires gives the movie a horrifying turn. Unusually for him, Clooney is portrayed as an aggressive person.

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Good Night, and Good Luck

Clooney has demonstrated to be a very gifted director, and he frequently highlights significant topics and historical events that he believes are significant. If creating a thorough drama about a contentious time in American history wasn’t difficult enough, Clooney gives a strong supporting role. David Strathairn gives a performance of his career, whilst other directors can be so narcissistic that they feel the need to also star in their own movies, Clooney is adept at managing an ensemble.

“Good Night, and Good Luck” follows CBS journalist and “See it Now” anchor Edward Murrow through the 1950s “red panic” over the emergence of communism (Strathairn). In the middle of Senator Joseph McCarthy’s attempts to implicate well-known media figures in being covert communists, Murrow and his colleagues fight to maintain their regular show. As the show’s producer Fred Friendly, who takes on the challenging responsibility of protecting the team, Clooney gives a crucial supporting performance. Clooney utilises this amazing true event to highlight the value of journalism and decry the censoring of divisive viewpoints.

Gravity


Clooney has the rare capacity to appear in control in tense situations, and he can give nurturing and consoling performances in exciting movies, according to Warner Brothers. One of the most aesthetically spectacular movies of the twenty-first century is Alfonso Cuaron’s 2013 space epic “Gravity,” which makes use of ground-breaking computer-generated graphics and an immersive 3D experience. It centres on astronauts Lieutenant Matt Kowalski (Clooney) and Dr. Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock), who become stuck after their NASA ship is damaged by a storm.

In an effort to escape a tragedy in her family past that she is dealing with, Stone has become fixated on going to space. As she mulls over her recollections, Kowalski is able to console and support her. Later, when the collision occurs, he assists her in surviving the hazardous scenario. Although Clooney appears in the movie only briefly, Stone remembers his moving performance throughout the narrative.

Hail, Caesar!

The Coen Brothers have gotten some of the funniest work out of Clooney’s whole oeuvre because he is more than happy to make fun of himself and deliver self-aware performances. “Hail, Caesar!” is a funny spoof of Hollywood’s Golden Age that features extravagant portrayals of well-known actors. It offers a thoughtful examination of the time period and boasts an impressive cast of stars playing delightfully absurd characters.

Clooney plays the pivotal character of Baird Whitlock, a well-known biblical epic hero akin to Charlton Heston or Robert Taylor, but Baird is utterly stupid, thus Clooney is winking at the ego and bloat of movie stars. Josh Brolin’s character Eddie Mannix, a Hollywood fixer, is in charge of him. When Baird disappears while Eddie is filming his latest historical epic, Eddie has to track him down. Although Baird is the plot’s main protagonist, he never seems to understand what’s happening or why he’s being kidnapped.

Michael Clayton

Some of Clooney’s best movies reveal a darker side to him, and he has demonstrated his ability to simultaneously be fearsome, vulnerable, and sympathetic. One of the most unsettling movies in Clooney’s résumé is Tony Gilroy’s 2007 courtroom thriller “Michael Clayton,” which grippingly examines the underworld of legal fixing and dubious legal procedures. Clooney would seem to be ideal for the character of a charismatic lawyer who can resolve difficult situations, but the movie is far different from a frolic like “Intolerable Cruelty.”

Clooney’s character, Michael Clayton, works as a legal “fixer” for a New York law practise by pressuring clients and providing lawyers with confidential information. Michael is given one of the most difficult cases of his career—his life is in risk as a result of a costly bad wager that lost him $75,000. His boss Marty Bach (Sydney Pollack), who suffered a public mental breakdown in the middle of a court trial, orders him to manage the firm’s top attorney Arthur Eden (Tom Wilkinson). He finds out that Karen Crowder (Tilda Swinton), a psychotherapist, is also aware of the cause of Arthur’s public outcry since he acquired access to confidential data that show the company was aware of a carcinogen that claimed many lives.

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O Brother, Where Art Thou?

Clooney has undoubtedly made some risky moves onstage, especially in his comedy roles. Because of the Coen Brothers’ distinct sense of comedy, he frequently has the chance to play characters that make him look foolish or silly. In the hilarious 2000 comedy “O Brother, Where Art Thou,” Clooney performs tough physical antics as well as singing. “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” recasts the Odyssey’s plot within the context of the American South during the Great Depression using characters from Greek mythology.

Serial robber Ulysses Everett McGill forms a group with fellow crooks Pete (John Turturro) and Delmar (Tim Blake Nelson) in search of an unidentified treasure. Washington Bartholomew Hogwallop, Everett’s cousin (played by Frank Collision), betrays them by turning them in to the local police. The trio meets the talented blues guitarist Tommy Johnson (Chris Thomas King) and forms the band the Soggy Bottom Boys in order to flee and hide their identities from the law. Despite the fact that the musicians’ personalities are really a facade, their recordings unexpectedly become hits. It’s not simple for Clooney to make the musical numbers funny while simultaneously demonstrating real talent. As Big Dan Teague, a travelling one-eyed Bible salesman who is also a con artist, John Goodman gives a funny performance.

Ocean’s Eleven

Danny Ocean is the best example of Clooney’s genuine charm. Clooney may be as smooth and endearing as his famous character, but Danny is a fully developed character with real depth. He is naturally weak, albeit it is not immediately apparent. Danny has built his career on his ability to captivate those around him and employs dramatic irony as a light-hearted diversion from any worries about his mental health. He must, however, be fully truthful as he competes for Tess, his ex-wife (Julia Roberts).

Clooney and Steven Soderbergh collaborated once more on “Ocean’s Eleven,” a remake of the 1960 Rat Pack movie of the same name. Ironically, Soderbergh’s version genuinely engages with the characters and takes its time to build up its precise heist sequences, unlike the original movie, which was very uninteresting and didn’t create a real story beyond the performances. The movie centres on Danny, who was just let out of jail but quickly goes back to his old ways by organising a series of casino robberies in Las Vegas with his closest friend Rusty Ryan (Brad Pitt). They assemble nine robbery specialists who labour to coordinate the intricate plan, but Danny conceals his true goal, which is regaining Tess from Terry Benedict, the owner of the casino (Andy Garcia). Early on, Danny and his crew form a strong bond, but with time, they start to doubt his leadership.

Out of Sight

Clooney’s natural charm makes him the ideal choice to star in caper movies, and throughout his career, he has appeared in a number of heist movies, including “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” “Three Kings,” and the “Ocean’s” trilogy. “Out of Sight” is another enjoyable classic that can be compared to those great movies. It was Clooney’s first time working with the talented Steven Soderbergh, and it marked the beginning of one of his most important professional relationships.

“Out of Sight,” which is based on the lauded Elmore Leonard novel, centres on bank robber Jack Foley (Clooney), who faces off against US Marshal Karen Sisco (Jennifer Lopez). Jack leads a robbery squad that Sisco is after, including Buddy Bragg (Ving Rhames) and Glenn Michaels (Steve Zahn), but despite their better judgement, Karen and Jack start to work together and develop a romance. Clooney and Lopez have great chemistry, and the nonlinear plot of the movie follows the development of their relationship.

Solaris

Remaking a well-liked classic carries a risk because it can be challenging for a sequel to compare favourably to the original. One of the most significant arthouse science fiction movies of the 1970s, Steven Soderbergh bravely reproduced the Russian science fiction classic “Solaris” from filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky. Fortunately, Soderbergh’s 2002 movie stands out while still reflecting on human existence and having a meditative tone. Clooney gives an excellent performance as Dr. Chris Kelvin, a professional psychologist.

To investigate a puzzling occurrence that DBA experts cannot explain, Kelvin is chosen for a journey to a distant space station orbiting the Solaris solar system. The mission’s specifics are unknown, and as Kelvin and the small crew go farther into space, their memories start to fade. When Kelvin has glimpses of the mysterious Rhea (Natascha McElhone), he struggles to distinguish between what is real and what is only in his mind.

 

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The Descendants

Fox Searchlight Clooney’s performance in Alexander Payne’s stirring 2011 movie “The Descendants” represents one of his most exposed moments on screen. Matthew King, played by Clooney, is a very successful lawyer who resides in a luxurious home in Honolulu, Hawaii. Two significant events drastically alter King’s life: He learns that his wife Elizabeth (Patricia Hastie) has been covertly having an affair when she suffers a dangerous boating accident and is placed into a medically induced coma.

King must get back in touch with his teenage daughter Alex (Shailene Woodley) and adolescent daughter Scottie in order to deal with Elizabeth’s condition (Amara Miller). Both daughters are estranged from their father and think that he is a spoiled, arrogant, and disconnected man. He makes an effort to connect with them while simultaneously getting ready in case Elizabeth’s condition deteriorates. The four of them look for Brian Speer (Matthew Lillard), the man Elizabeth was having an affair with, and he unwillingly enlists the help of Alex’s boyfriend Sid (Nick Krause).

King is also thinking about what will happen to his family trust, which gives his extended family a sizable amount of land. The land is extremely valuable if the Kings were to sell it, but they have also owned it as a family for many centuries.

The Ides of March

The gripping 2011 political drama “The Ides of March” from Sony Pictures Clooney is one of the most agonisingly accurate portraits of the current American election cycle in contemporary cinema, and Clooney once again establishes himself as a director with his outstanding direction and script. He co-stars as Democratic Governor of Pennsylvania Mike Morris, a candidate for the presidency of the United States who is in strong contention to win the primary.

With the aid of Stephen Meyers, a highly capable junior manager who supports Morris’ cause, Paul Zara, the campaign manager for Morris (played by Philip Seymour Hoffman), navigates a challenging press cycle. Morris feels confident in Meyers’ skills and their chances of success, but Meyers discovers that Morris has been having an illicit relationship with Molly Stearns, an intern played by Evan Rachel Wood, with whom he is also emotionally connected. Meyers is forced to reconsider his view of Morris after the horrific death of Molly in a car accident, and he considers working with Tom Duffy, the opposing campaign manager (Paul Giamatti).

Up in the Air

Despite having the appearance of being well-connected and wealthy, Clooney has a great talent for portraying characters who are frantically looking for a genuine connection. In his gripping 2009 drama “Up in the Air,” Jason Reitman explores a man whose life is slipping away from him and who is unable to gauge his own development. Ryan Bigham, the character he plays, is a corporate “downsizer” whose main responsibility is to travel to different locations and inform people that they have been fired. Although it’s not a pleasant job, Ryan has developed into an adept at breaking bad news to people. As he works, he sees several breakdowns, tantrums, and heartbreaking situations.

Natalie Keener (Anna Kendrick), a young new hire, is given the responsibility of becoming Ryan’s mentor and travelling companion while he conducts business. Ryan has doubts about Natalie’s ability. Natalie demonstrated her importance to the firm by firing a number of employees through video conference, but Ryan believes that doing so online is less intimate and difficult than doing so face-to-face. He doubts that she is emotionally capable of handling his difficult chats. Although Ryan is sceptical of Natalie’s ambitious attitude, the two develop a bond as they travel. Ryan also becomes aware that he has walled himself off from emotions.

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